My Notebook

RSS
Sep 1

meowgon:

kinginthewest:

it’s just like, why are there cat emojis for loads of emotions as well as normal humans emojis

image

like, when do i need to express these emotions… but as a cat

they’re not for you… they’re for ME

image

Sep 1

girlsbydaylight:

avec toi by Sana on pixiv

Sep 1
ilovewords:

[ i l o v e w o r d s ]

ilovewords:

[ i l o v e w o r d s ]

(Source: hqlines)

Sep 1
Sep 1

CLINTASHA AU - The woes of a superspy couple.

"You’re mad at me for forgetting your fake birthday?! But that wasn’t even in the file! Nat!"

(Source: loveholic198)

Sep 1

oliviawhen:

Hello I’ve been super busy doing things I can’t share yet, so in the mean time please enjoy this self portrait gif.

Sep 1
comickergirl:

Group Hug

comickergirl:

Group Hug

Sep 1

So, I'm writing a story, and I really feel as if the side-characters are getting more attention and spotlight time than the actual main character. Any tips or advice?

Anonymous

characterandwritinghelp:

This can be defined as Designated Protagonist Syndrome, or Vanilla Protagonist. Sometimes, the cause is that your supporting cast is more interesting or dynamic than your main character. This is not always a bad thing, but for the sake of argument and completeness:

  • Develop your main: Check the character development tag for more specific, in-depth advice on developing characters. Here is a quick guide for three-dimensionalizing characters, as well as the quizzes tag for good measure. Perhaps one reason your main character is getting less “screentime” than your others is that they are less completely fleshed-out than the others.
  • Look at your characters: Is the character you call your main character actually the main character? Or are they a peripheral character through which you are telling the story? Would they even be suited to the role of a side character? Clarifying the role of all the characters in the story, including your main, can help you identify where and why your main is not getting the attention they need. A paradigm shift might be in order, if a peripheral main/narrator is not your cup of tea.
  • Develop your plot: Take a look at your plot alongside your characters as you start defining the characters’ roles. Does a lot of the action happen to or because of a given character? Are certain characters absent for key moments? Are there any characters who are present for some parts, but missing from other critical points? Do the characters who fit some of these criteria count as “main” characters in your story? Your plot may need some reworking in order to bring your main character forward.

Remember that it is not a bad thing to have developed minor characters, and that nothing you write is set in stone (at least, until it hits the printing press/goes live online/you carve it into granite to preserve for future generations). You can change around the order of your story, mess around with the plot and conflict, and rework it as much as you need to in order to make everything work. If something is proving problematic, change it! It might lead you somewhere good.

-Headless

Sep 1

(Source: freecss-gon)

Sep 1

(Source: xoziva)

Sep 1
Sep 1

APPRECIATION POSTS

masa-yu-ki:

image

image

Sep 1

Insistence on plausibility and rationality can work for the writer, not against him. In developing his characters, he is obliged to go deeper instead of wider. And, as in all literature, characters are what ultimately count. The writer of fantasy may have a slight edge on the realistic novelist, who must present his characters within the confines of actuality. Fantasy, too, uses homely detail, but at the same time goes right to the core of a character, to extract the essence, the very taste of an individual personality. This may be one of the things that makes good fantasy so convincing. The essence is poetic truth.

- Lloyd Alexander (via j-august)

Sep 1

drowning-in-bloody-memories:

Mulan is going 3D.

Sep 1

shoujo-addict:

2話の後